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02/01/2013

Dissolution kinetics and mechanisms at dolomite-water interfaces: Effects of electrolyte-specific ionic strength

Source: Dan Hawkes

Elucidating dissolution kinetics and mechanisms at carbonate mineral–water interfaces is essential to many environmental and geochemical processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration in deep aquifers. ESD’s Kevin Knauss and others investigated the effects of background electrolytes on dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2) reactivity by measuring step dissolution rates using in situ hydrothermal atomic force microscopy (HAFM) at 90°C. HAFM results demonstrated that dolomite step retreat rates increased with increasing solution ionic strength and decreasing pH.

Dolomite-waterFor more information, go to:

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es301284h

Citation: Xu, M., K. Sullivan G. Van Ness, K.G. Knauss, and S.R. Higgins (2013), Dissolution kinetics and mechanisms at dolomite-water interfaces: Effects of electrolyte-specific ionic strength. Environmental Science & Technology 47(1), 110–118. DOI:10.1021/es301284h.

Funding Source: BES