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8 posts from August 2011

08/23/2011

Waychunas Wins Clay Minerals Award

The American Clay Minerals Society has honored ESD’s Glenn Waychunas with the “Pioneer in Clay Science” award, to be bestowed on him at the Clay Minerals Society Annual Meeting at Lake Tahoe, this coming September 25–30.

Thawing Permafrost Could Release Vast Amounts of Carbon and Accelerate Climate Change

Billions of tons of carbon trapped in permafrost may be released into the atmosphere by the end of this century as the Earth’s climate changes, according to a new computer modeling study led by ESD's Charles Koven.

08/18/2011

Safe Extraction and Production of Energy Sources involving Fluid Injection

Ernie Majer and his team are exploring ways to increase the productivity and effectiveness of energy source recovery and geologic sequestration sites, while simultaneously informing and ensuring the safety of the neighboring public.

08/17/2011

ESD Scientists Blogging from Arctic

ESD's Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn are part of a team of scientists traveling to the Arctic to identify field study sites and meet with community leaders at part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment.

08/11/2011

Hazen/Microbes Make ES&T Cover

ESD's Terry Hazen makes the cover of ES&T in a feature summarizing the differences between the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989 and the BP Deepwater Horizon spill in 2010.

ESD Communications Digest - July 2011

This digest provides you a summary of communication highlights from around the division that were added or updated during the course of the month.

08/10/2011

Vivi's Safety Corner - July 2011

Are your safety concerns being addressed? You have rights! Chickenpox reported in Bldg. 90 - what you need to know!

08/03/2011

New Carbon Explorer Rides the Storm

Autonomous Carbon Explorers, robotic floats devised by ESD's Jim Bishop descend a kilometer beneath the surface and then return to report their findings via satellite.